As expected, today was lousy. It was less lousy than it could have been, however, and I’ll take that.

One of the things that put me back in a (marginally) better mood this afternoon was Dan ‘Flutterby’ Lyke’s rant on cleaning up after Burning Man. Thanks.

Cleaning out the bookmark cache; some of the links below were probably seen on other blogs. As always, sorry for not giving credit directly.

I finally got around to building OBAS, a piece of bibliography management software. It’s really a bunch of Perl that talks to a SQL backend, with all the interface stuff in a web browser. So, of course, I had to build and configure Apache, and then build and configure MySQL, before OBAS. Once built, OBAS promptly crashed Netscape, and did many other Bad Things. So, I’m looking for a good SQL book, so I can work on whipping up my own CGI/SQL/Perl/Apache bibliography thing (‘cuz, well, it just seems like fun, and it would be useful to have around, as EndNote sucks). Is the O’Reilly * MySQL & mSQL* any good? The reader reviews are mixed.

Renaissance man?

Relative ratings of the Superfriends. What about the AmerInd guy who said the magic word and then got really tall? He gives Aquaman a run for his money, I think.

W3M is a text-based web browser, much like Lynx. W3M, however, can actually render tables and frames, which is useful.

Scientific accuracy and messing with people’s minds:

“And, frankly, just because Tropicana owns 41 percent of the market, you know, and is the top dog, doesn’t mean that they can play fast and loose with the laws of nature.”

(via Camworld.)

The lack of Clue over E-biomed continues in the NEJM:

Do they really think that a “virtual community of experts and users” could conduct on-line peer review that would help clinicians to interpret and use the information in their practices? That seems quite unlikely to me. Who would moderate the discussion, and how would differences of opinion and conflicting claims be resolved?

(via Health ‘n Hacks.)

One step closer to Sterling’s chlorophyll hack

An interesting take on the sociology of romance novels, and the cultural clashes and fallout from new sub-genres featuring more explicit sex scenes.

Monsanto annouces a halt to ‘Terminator’ seed development. A wise PR move, especially considering that hybrid strains offer mavy of the same ‘benefits’ — from Monsanto’s POV, that is.

Cool new ‘blog title: One Swell Foop. Coming to a start page near you…

LinuxPlanet interviews Tim O’Reilly

I also don’t believe that necessarily you get a lot of benefit in the same way from making documentation completely free. At the end of the day, a book is its own source code, it’s not as though the content is hidden in some way. There’s certain a role for people patching things, but people don’t, for example, routinely do all their own patches to the Linux kernel, they send in patches which are then integrated by somebody. Well, that already happens with books; we get comments all the time which we’re integrating, so we already have a lot of the benefits of an open process with books regardless of whether or not they’re redistributed for free, and you get some negatives.

Nerd Test at Archie McPhee. I got a 102%, but you get a huge bonus for taking the quiz while actually running Linux…

And I’ll leave you with this: UK may import sperm. Not a lot to add to that one; not a lot that I want to add, anyway…

(META: corrected the date on yesterday’s entry.)

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